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Contact your Regional ADA Center

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) National Network consists of 10 regional ADA Centers and an ADA Knowledge Translation Center. The regional ADA Centers are distributed throughout the United States to provide local assistance and foster implementation of the ADA. Find the ADA Center that serves your State by visiting the ADA website and clicking on the map https://adata.org/find-your-region

Source Credit: The ADA National Network
View Online: Contact your Regional ADA Center

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2018-08-24T02:53:43+00:00Categories: .pdf, Accessible Parking Users/Advocates|

AAMVA Best Practices Guide in Deterring and Detecting Fraud and Misuse

The Best Practices Guide assists motor vehicle departments in improving the issuance of disability placards and plates, the deterrence and detection of fraud in these areas, and the enforcement of disability parking violations. The intent is not to identify the one approach that all jurisdictions should follow but rather to serve as a starting point for an informed local discussion on how best to marry needs for accessible parking with needs for general parking. 

The Best Practices Guide provides guidance in the following areas; Fraud identification, issuance and renewal processes, product standards, medical issues and requirements, outreach and education, enforcement strategies, and legislation, case law, and legal challenges.

This publication resulted from a cooperative agreement between the U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), and the American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators (AAMVA).

Source Credit: AAMVA

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U.S. Access Board Accessible Parking and Passenger Loading Zones Webinar – Advanced

This archived webinar session’s documentation provides an in-depth review of requirements in the ADA and ABA Accessibility Standards for parking spaces and passenger loading zones. Topics to be addressed include the minimum number required, location, van spaces, vertical clearances, alterations, signage, valet parking and more. Participants interested in this session are encouraged to review archived sessions on this topic for a review of the basic provisions. You can view the webinar and related documentation online.

Source credit: United States Access Board

DOWNLOAD: Accessible Parking and Passenger Loading Zones – Advanced
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U.S. Access Board Accessible Parking and Passenger Loading Zones Webinar

If you have questions about access to parking spaces and passenger loading zones, including the required number, location, vertical clearances and other specifications, this is the session for you. Other topics to be addressed include van spaces, the number of spaces required in medical care facilities, alterations, signage, valet parking and more. The information will cover requirements in the current standards under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Architectural Barriers Act (ABA) along with upcoming revisions to the ADA standards. You can view the webinar and related documentation online.

Source credit: United States Access Board
View online: Accessible Parking and Passenger Loading Zones

 

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Accessible Parking Etiquette

The ability to safely park at one’s destination is an important component of community participation for people with disabilities. With the proper permit, people with disabilities should be able to use accessible parking spaces in public parking lots. However, a lot of people with disabilities have encountered barriers to parking.

Source Credit: University of Kansas Research and Training Center on Independent Living
This brochure is made possible by a grant from the Dole Institute of Politics, with funding from the General Electric Company.
Endorsed by the Kansas Commission on Disability Concerns and the Kansas Association of Centers for Independent Living. View Online: Accessible Parking Etiquette

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Deterring Access Aisle Parking Violations

The ability to safely park at one’s destination is an important component of community participation for people with disabilities. With the proper permit, people with disabilities should be able to use accessible parking spaces in public parking lots. However, a lot of people with disabilities have encountered barriers to parking. Researchers at the Research and Training Center on Independent Living at KU conducted two studies on accessible parking. This study examined factors related to access aisle violations. Access aisles are the diagonally marked spaces adjacent to the accessible parking spaces that are designed for use by people with disabilities. Access aisles are usually marked with yellow, white, or blue diagonal stripes.

Source Credit: University of Kansas Research and Training Center on Independent Living
This material is reproduced with permission of the University of Kansas Research and Training Center on Independent Living. In addition, please add “The contents of this publication were developed under a grant from the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR grant number 90RT5015). NIDILRR is a Center within the Administration for Community Living (ACL), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). These contents do not necessarily represent the policy of NIDILRR, ACL, or HHS, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government.

DOWNLOAD: Deterring Access Aisle Parking Violations Fact Sheet
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Encouraging Reservation of Van Designated Spaces for Lift-or-Ramp-Equipped Van Users

The ability to safely park at one’s destination is an important component of community participation for people with disabilities. With the proper permit, people with disabilities should be able to use accessible parking spaces in public parking lots. However, a lot of people with disabilities have encountered barriers to parking. Researchers at the Research and Training Center on Independent Living at KU conducted two studies on accessible parking. This study examined using different signage to encourage reservation of van-accessible spaces for people who use ramp- or lift-equipped vehicles. Wheelchair users who travel in a ramp- or lift-equipped van (RLEV) often reach their destination only to find the van-accessible parking space occupied by a non-ramp or lift-equipped vehicle (NRLEV) that does not need the wider access aisle placed next to van-accessible spaces. This study found that alternate signage for van-accessible parking spaces can prompt  rivers of vehicles without ramps or lifts to use a regular accessible space when available, reserving the van accessible space for RLEV users.

Source Credit: University of Kansas Research and Training Center on Independent Living 
This material is reproduced with permission of the University of Kansas Research and Training Center on Independent Living. In addition, please add “The contents of this publication were developed under a grant from the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR grant number 90RT5015). NIDILRR is a Center within the Administration for Community Living (ACL), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). These contents do not necessarily represent the policy of NIDILRR, ACL, or HHS, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government.

DOWNLOAD: Parking Equity: Encouraging Reservation of Van Designated Spaces for Lift-or-Ramp-Equipped Van Users Fact Sheet
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Draft Legislation – Tiered Parking Meter Exemption

Currently disability parking permits provide a parking meter fee exemption. By law it is 2.5 hours or the maximum time the meter allows, whichever is longer. Some permittees cannot reach or operate a meter due to a disability. By making it apply to all permittees, it created an incentive for people to fraudulently obtain or use permits belonging to someone else. The bill restricts the exemption to those who are medically certified to be unable to reach or operate a parking meter due to a disability. The bill did not pass this last legislative session, but DCAB intends to reintroduce it.

Source Credit: State of Hawaii Department of Health Disability and Communication Access Board

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