Parking Enforcers/Legislators

Deterring Access Aisle Parking Violations

The ability to safely park at one’s destination is an important component of community participation for people with disabilities. With the proper permit, people with disabilities should be able to use accessible parking spaces in public parking lots. However, a lot of people with disabilities have encountered barriers to parking. Researchers at the Research and Training Center on Independent Living at KU conducted two studies on accessible parking. This study examined factors related to access aisle violations. Access aisles are the diagonally marked spaces adjacent to the accessible parking spaces that are designed for use by people with disabilities. Access aisles are usually marked with yellow, white, or blue diagonal stripes.

Source Credit: University of Kansas Research and Training Center on Independent Living
This material is reproduced with permission of the University of Kansas Research and Training Center on Independent Living. In addition, please add “The contents of this publication were developed under a grant from the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR grant number 90RT5015). NIDILRR is a Center within the Administration for Community Living (ACL), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). These contents do not necessarily represent the policy of NIDILRR, ACL, or HHS, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government.

DOWNLOAD: Deterring Access Aisle Parking Violations Fact Sheet
(PDF | 826kb)

 

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Encouraging Reservation of Van Designated Spaces for Lift-or-Ramp-Equipped Van Users

The ability to safely park at one’s destination is an important component of community participation for people with disabilities. With the proper permit, people with disabilities should be able to use accessible parking spaces in public parking lots. However, a lot of people with disabilities have encountered barriers to parking. Researchers at the Research and Training Center on Independent Living at KU conducted two studies on accessible parking. This study examined using different signage to encourage reservation of van-accessible spaces for people who use ramp- or lift-equipped vehicles. Wheelchair users who travel in a ramp- or lift-equipped van (RLEV) often reach their destination only to find the van-accessible parking space occupied by a non-ramp or lift-equipped vehicle (NRLEV) that does not need the wider access aisle placed next to van-accessible spaces. This study found that alternate signage for van-accessible parking spaces can prompt  rivers of vehicles without ramps or lifts to use a regular accessible space when available, reserving the van accessible space for RLEV users.

Source Credit: University of Kansas Research and Training Center on Independent Living 
This material is reproduced with permission of the University of Kansas Research and Training Center on Independent Living. In addition, please add “The contents of this publication were developed under a grant from the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR grant number 90RT5015). NIDILRR is a Center within the Administration for Community Living (ACL), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). These contents do not necessarily represent the policy of NIDILRR, ACL, or HHS, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government.

DOWNLOAD: Parking Equity: Encouraging Reservation of Van Designated Spaces for Lift-or-Ramp-Equipped Van Users Fact Sheet
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Draft Legislation – Tiered Parking Meter Exemption

Currently disability parking permits provide a parking meter fee exemption. By law it is 2.5 hours or the maximum time the meter allows, whichever is longer. Some permittees cannot reach or operate a meter due to a disability. By making it apply to all permittees, it created an incentive for people to fraudulently obtain or use permits belonging to someone else. The bill restricts the exemption to those who are medically certified to be unable to reach or operate a parking meter due to a disability. The bill did not pass this last legislative session, but DCAB intends to reintroduce it.

Source Credit: State of Hawaii Department of Health Disability and Communication Access Board

DOWNLOAD: Draft Legislation – Tiered Parking Meter Exemption
(PDF | 232kb)

 

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State of Illinois Parking Program for Persons with Disabilities Law Enforcement Guide

State of Illinois Parking Program for Persons with Disabilities Law Enforcement Guide.

Source Credit: Office of the Illinois Secretary of State
View Online: Parking Program for Persons with Disabilities Law Enforcement Guide

DOWNLOAD: Parking Program for Persons with Disabilities Law Enforcement Guide
(PDF | 989kb)

 

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SFMTA-Parking Meter Revenue Audit Report

2014 Controllers Report on barriers that prevent the SFMTA from collecting the maximum potential parking meter revenue. Audit showed disabled placards comprised 40% of all nonpayment by vehicles at parking meters.

Source Credit: City and County of San Francisco, Office of the Controller

DOWNLOAD: SFMTA-Parking Meter Revenue Audit Report
(PDF | 704kb)

 

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Model Legislation – Colorado

This document contains model legislation for a two-tier placard act signed into law May 29th, 2018.

Source Credit: Colorado General Assembly
View Online: HB18-1285 Remuneration-exempt Disability Parking Placard

DOWNLOAD: Model Legislation – Colorado
(PDF | 255kb)

 

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Texas 2016 Study on Accessible Parking and Disabled Placard Abuse: A Status Update

The Texas Governor’s Committee on People with Disabilities presented an overview of its study on accessible parking and an update on accessible parking activities around the country to the Texas Council on Developmental Disabilities on May 3, 2018. This presentation summarizes study findings, recommendations, and noted best practices from other states to deter accessible parking and disabled placard fraud and abuse. Recent legislative efforts from around the country on disabled placard fraud and abuse and the formation of the National Accessible Parking Coalition formed in December 2017 are also highlighted.

Source Credit: Texas Governor’s Committee on People with Disabilities
View Online: https://gov.texas.gov/organization/disabilities/goals

DOWNLOAD: GCPD’s 2016 Study on Accessible Parking and Disabled Placard Abuse: A Status Update
(PDF | 2.6mb)

 

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Texas Interim Report: A Review of Accessible Parking for Persons with Disabilities

During the 84th Legislative Session, House Bill 1317 charged the Texas Governor’s Committee on People with Disabilities to study accessible parking issues. Areas mandated for study included accessible parking laws and requirements in Texas and other states; the ADA and related federal regulations, 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design, and 2012 Texas Accessibility Standards; and accessible parking policies for state-owned parking lots and the Texas State Capitol grounds. This report discusses findings that emerged from data gathered from sources including public testimony, surveys distributed to persons with disabilities and businesses, state multi-agency meetings, and similarly-situated organizations in other states.

Source Credit: Texas Governor’s Committee on People with Disabilities
View Online: https://gov.texas.gov/organization/disabilities/goals

DOWNLOAD: Interim Report: A Review of Accessible Parking for Persons with Disabilities
(PDF | 14.5mb)

 

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Can Induced Empathy Cause Behavioral Change? A Pilot Study of Alternative Signage to Reduce Accessible Parking Space Violations

A pilot study that tested the effectiveness of an empathy targeting sign on decreasing the number of parking violations in accessible parking spaces for people with disabilities was conducted in Fairfax County. Observational data was collected during a six-week A-B-A design. During the treatment period the empathy targeting sign was placed below the traditional signs at four accessible parking spaces. Although no statistically significant differences were observed in parking behaviors, notable trends in the desired direction were seen during the treatment period (a reduction in the number of violations and an increase in the number of potential violations where drivers seemingly changed their minds about parking in the accessible spaces).

Source Credit: Michael Waltrip, Ami Getu, (George Mason University), Michael Perel (Fairfax Area Commission on Aging)

DOWNLOAD: Can Induced Empathy Cause Behavioral Change? A pilot study
(PDF | 821 kb)

 

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Los Angeles Accessible Parking Policy Advisory Committee Report

In summer 2016, a Los Angeles committee on Accessible Parking was formed at the request of Mayor Garcetti. This stakeholder group was comprised of disability rights advocates, transportation experts, and other stakeholder representatives. The group was charged with better understanding the complex issues around accessible parking, and coming up with a series of recommended solutions. The group met for nearly nine months, arriving at a package of policy recommendations to increase access to street parking for disabled drivers and reducing parking placard misuse.

Source Credit: City of Los Angeles Department of Transportation

DOWNLOAD: Los Angeles Accessible Parking Policy Advisory Committee Report
(PDF | 73kb)

 

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