Signage

Let’s Make Accessible Parking More Accessible: A Practical Guide to Addressing Disabled Placard Abuse and Other Parking Issues for People with Disabilities

This groundbreaking, 24-page publication provides a roadmap for addressing issues related to accessible parking and disabled placard/plate abuse. Topics include statistics that confirm the scope of the problem, deterring fraudulent use of disabled placards/plates, parking design and streetscape issues that interfere with access, misuse of access aisles for van accessible parking spaces, empathetic signage, technological solutions, enforcement issues, citizen activism, and more. The publication includes dozens of ideas from cities, universities, and others, along with practical action items.

Source Credit: Accessible Parking Coalition
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Download — APC Guide: Let’s Make Accessible Parking More Accessible
(PDF | 6mb)

 

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Guidance on Use of the International Symbol of Accessibility Under the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Architectural Barriers Act

The U.S. Access Board provided guidance on the use of the International Symbol of Accessibility (ISA) under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Architectural Barriers Act (ABA). This guidance explains how use of a symbol other than the ISA may impact compliance with standards issued under the ADA and the ABA.

Source Credit: U.S. Access Board
View Online: https://www.access-board.gov/guidelines-and-standards/buildings-and-sites/about-the-ada-standards/guide-to-the-ada-standards/guidance-on-the-isa

 

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Can Induced Empathy Cause Behavioral Change? A Pilot Study of Alternative Signage to Reduce Accessible Parking Space Violations

A pilot study that tested the effectiveness of an empathy targeting sign on decreasing the number of parking violations in accessible parking spaces for people with disabilities was conducted in Fairfax County. Observational data was collected during a six-week A-B-A design. During the treatment period the empathy targeting sign was placed below the traditional signs at four accessible parking spaces. Although no statistically significant differences were observed in parking behaviors, notable trends in the desired direction were seen during the treatment period (a reduction in the number of violations and an increase in the number of potential violations where drivers seemingly changed their minds about parking in the accessible spaces).

Source Credit: Michael Waltrip, Ami Getu, (George Mason University), Michael Perel (Fairfax Area Commission on Aging)

DOWNLOAD: Can Induced Empathy Cause Behavioral Change? A pilot study
(PDF | 821 kb)

 

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